About Barcelona

Caught between the Mediterranean and the mountains, Barcelona is Spain’s second city and easily its most international, the heartbeat of wealthy and industrious Catalonia. Beloved by locals and visitors alike, it is an exciting city of art by the sea with an alluring blend of history and culture in architecture and design. Barcelona offers great food and excellent hotels, an historic heart, and the Costa Brava and Girona (the very centre of Spanish gastronomy) an easy day trip away.
 
Smooth connections both naturally and internationally are facilitated by Barcelona airport and the AVE high-speed train which connects to Madrid and Paris in three and six hours respectively. There are international schools and an established community of chic Spanish families who stroll in the city’s many parks or spend lazy sunny Sundays at a chiringuito – a beach club.

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Where to settle?

Smooth connections both naturally and internationally are facilitated by Barcelona airport and the AVE high-speed train which connects to Madrid and Paris in three and six hours respectively. There are international schools and an established community of chic Spanish families who stroll in the city’s many parks or spend lazy sunny Sundays at a chiringuito – a beach club.
 
The 1992 Olympics began the transformation of the seafront, which has continued with Port Vell, a super yacht marina opposite the narrow tumble of terraced homes in the former fishing village of Barceloneta. Poble Nou, further east on the coast, is gaining a reputation as a high tech district with younger, on-trend buyers.
 
Elsewhere elegant Eixample, full of high ceilinged Modernist buildings, is a prime area of residential property in Barcelona. It was laid out on a rigid grid system in the 1890s and links the Roman and Gothic Old Town with the family-friendly residential villages under the mountains such as Turo Park and Sarria.
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Silence or more buzz?

Quieter areas to live include the financial district Les Corts, fifteen minutes by metro into the centre, and Poble Sec, a residential area towards Monjuïc, fifteen minutes walk from Las Ramblas.
 
The narrow, often dark streets of El Borne in the Old Town provide easy access to tiny atmospheric tapas bars. Twenty years ago this was an often grubby, unremarkable part of Barcelona. Today designers and artists have moved in to produce a vibrant creative community in the oldest part of the city.

 
 
Property in Spain

It might have been sunshine and sea that brought early home owners and holiday makers to Spain, but it is the increasingly sophisticated facilities on offer that have kept them coming back.

 

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